PET for honey re-launch

Eye-catching new bottles are behind the high-profile re-launch of Rowse Honey, a leading UK honey brand.

Rowse_Honey
Rowse_Honey

Rowse Honey has used the theme of a honeycomb as the design basis for its new packaging. The custom molded bottles therefore needed to incorporate a hexagonal pattern, as well as providing space for improved labeling with a hand-written feel. As a result, the lightweight PET squeezy bottles created by RPC Llantrisant now feature a hexagonal recess instead of the previous torpedo shape.

The range includes 340-g and 680-g bottles with flip-top caps and a 1.36-kg variant with a valve cap. The recyclable bottles are made on single-stage Aoki injection stretch blow molding machines.

“The bottles had to be introduced smoothly onto Rowse’s filling lines without any major disruption to production,” says Dean Williams, a designer at RPC Llantrisant. “All the preform tooling used for the bottles was new and custom made to blow the Rowse shapes.”

The rebranding has been supported with a peak-time UK television ad campaign and an enhanced online presence, which highlights the packaging. Sarah Mitchell, brand manager for Rowse Honey in Wallingford, Oxfordshire, says, “We carried out a lot of research to uncover exactly what consumers want, and this resulted in the design we have today. The clear bottles produced by RPC augment the naturalness of the honey and help make a real impact on the shelf.”

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