Mott's takes a new tack in aseptic juice (sidebar)

People, people, people

In an installation as sophisticated as Mott’s new aseptic line, paying close attention to the human element is critical, says vice president of engineering Mark McAndrew.

“A hallmark of the Mott’s culture is that we like to build on our successes,” says McAndrew. “As we’ve converted to aseptically filled PET since ‘93, a lot of in-house learning took place, and here at Aspers we’ve put people in a position to leverage that learning wherever possible.”

The firm also went to great lengths to ensure that the Shibuya installation crew—who numbered anywhere from 15 to 25 from April to October of 2002—had a positive and productive experience during installation and start-up.

“We sent our Aspers people to a college in Baltimore for about 30 hours of training in Japanese culture,” says plant manager Tom Leedy. “It helped a lot.”

No doubt it’s touches like these that placed the Aspers plant on the top ten list in a recent Pennsylvania survey and award program designed to identify the best places to work in the state.

“This award is especially gratifying,” says Leedy. “The point of difference for us is not the high-tech equipment, and it’s not the leading manufacturing processes. Any company can buy such equipment. It’s getting the people part right that’s the key.”

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