Download Download this free, 150-page Pharmaceutical Serialization Playbook jam-packed with strategies for success and pitfalls to avoid.  Learn more >>
Article |

Rx distributor turns to internal RFID (sidebar)

New drug bottle ‘Targets’ safety concerns
Print Reprint
FILED IN:  Package Type  > Containers
     

A prescription bottle designed for Target Corp. pharmacies gives new meaning to the phrase “extreme makeover.” Deborah Adler the mastermind behind Target’s ClearRx bottle design developed the idea while attending the School of Visual Arts in Manhattan. When her grandmother accidentally took the wrong pills she realized it was time for a more user-friendly design that would allow patients to easily identify their medication.

Adler sold her idea to Minneapolis-based Target and with the help of industrial designer Klaus Rosberg the retailer implemented the ClearRx bottle for both liquids and pills. The bottles which sport Target’s signature red color are extrusion/blow-molded using PETG.

Matt Grisik project manager explains that most prescription bottles are polypropylene; however Target chose PETG for its improved clarity. Instead of the typical cylindrical shape the bottle has a flat surface making it easier to see and read the label. Both the 15- and 30-dram bottles sit on their caps allowing the label to be wrapped around the top of the bottle.

Target worked with Adler and a labeling company to create a new die for the sheet containing the bottle labels the patient information card and the patient information sheet. An adhesive backing on the label allows the patient information card to slide behind the label so that it stays with the product. Colored rings added to the bottle neck help patients identify their prescriptions.

The new bottle which was launched nationwide in May replaces traditional amber-colored vials. Although the new bottle will be exhibited at New York’s Museum of Modern Art this fall its sleek eye-catching appearance is more a byproduct of the redesign’s ultimate goal: To create a package in which every element helps promote patient safety and compliance. —Kassandra Kania

See the story that goes with this sidebar: Rx distributor turns to internal RFID

Comments(0)

Add new comment

Related Sponsored Content

E-BOOK SPECIAL REPORT
42 Best Package Designs
Sign up to receive timely updates from our editors and download this e-book consisting of our editors' picks of most notable package designs. Updated for 2014!
x

Newsletters

Don't miss intelligence crucial to your job and business!
Click on any newsletter to view a sample. Enter your email address below to sign up!
GENERAL INTEREST
PACKAGE DESIGN/DEVELOPMENT
Each newsletter ranges in frequency from once per month to a few times per month at most.