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Salmon 'catches' retort pouch, too

Chicken of the Sea has found the salmon running its way. For about a year, the San Diego, CA-based company has marketed its pink salmon in a 7.1-oz retorted pouch, much like its tuna products.
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FILED IN:  Package Type  > Bags/pouches
     

In fact says marketing director Van Effner the new notched pouch is virtually identical to the polyester/nylon/aluminum foil/sealant structure that’s used for tuna. He’s less than specific about the pouch because it’s sourced from two unidentified suppliers in Japan then filled and retorted in Thailand before it’s shipped to the United States.

“From when I put the first plan together we’ve more than doubled the results we had projected at this point” Effner says. “Plus we’ve found the sales to be incremental to our canned salmon.”

Like the tuna pouch the graphics on this pouch tout its “no waste no draining” feature since the product is packed without extra water. And thanks to its shorter retort processing the package also says the product has “improved texture.” Plus Effner says the price premium for this pouch isn’t as great as it is with retort-pouched tuna. The pouch sells for $2.29 compared to $1.59 for a 6-oz can of salmon. Pouches are packed into paperboard vertical-display shippers with fluted sides that hold the pouches upright. —AO

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