Alert: Packaging World now enhanced for the iPad and iPhone. Watch a quick video preview
 
Download this free, 80-page Food Safety Playbook jam-packed with strategies for success, best practices, how to ensure compliance with FSMA, and pitfalls to avoid. Written specifically from a packaging perspective  Learn more >>
 
Article |

Do uninviting labels jeopardize sales of good beers?

One author’s observations suggest this possibility. Consumers may be turned off by unappealing graphics and question brew quality when certain information is absent.
Print Reprint
FILED IN:  Package Component  > Label
     

The marketing muscle of the label is well-known among brand stewards. A great label can give a product “pick-up power” and get it into the shopper’s cart—at least the first time. Beer is a case in point.

What happens when the quality of the label doesn’t match the quality of the product? A blog called beer(en)stein found, anecdotally, at least, that poorly designed labels could hurt sales of well-crafted beers. Take a look at what this author says are the important pieces of information that should be on a label to indicate the brewer is serious about making a quality beer.

Simplicity is “in” in labeling. Give consumers only the most essential information, and tell them a story that compels them to become buyers of your product. But this article makes a good point. When the label design doesn’t sit well with consumers, and key information is missing or incomplete to help guide consumers’ decision-making, they might well perceive that the quality of the beer inside is questionable.

Comments(0)

Add new comment

ADVERTISEMENT
E-BOOK SPECIAL REPORT
42 Best Package Designs
Sign up to receive timely updates from our editors and download this e-book consisting of our editors' picks of most notable package designs. Updated for 2014!
x

Newsletters

Don't miss intelligence crucial to your job and business!
Click on any newsletter to view a sample. Enter your email address below to sign up!
GENERAL INTEREST
PACKAGE DESIGN/DEVELOPMENT
Each newsletter ranges in frequency from once per month to a few times per month at most.