Download this free, 140-page Flexible Packaging Playbook jam-packed with strategies for success, best practices, and pitfalls to avoid.  Learn more »
Glenroy invites you to download this playbook.
Article |

Crest 'books' info-paneled carton

In a novel approach, a carton’s informational fold-out fifth panel enlightens users about the benefits of Crest Whitestrips.
Print Reprint
     

For two specialty market presentations for Crest Whitestrips Procter & Gamble Cincinnati OH chose uncommon book-style cartons. The paperboard cartons contain a polyvinyl chloride folding carton of the dental whitening system.

The novel duo was led by the spring 2001 launch of an “associates’ kit” sent to retail store managers and pharmacy personnel. That was followed in winter 2001 by a test market for a consumer photographic gift pack of Whitestrips.

The cartons represent different adaptions and sizes of a straight-tuck five-panel book-style carton. On the associates’ kit the fifth panel unfolds. The cartons are made of 24-pt SBS offset-printed in four colors on two sides die cut folded and glued.

The atypical cartons are structurally designed converted assembled and packaged by Neff Packaging (Dayton OH) in a turnkey contract packaging operation. Neff receives Whitestrips packed in printed 4’’ x 5’’ x 2’’ PVC cartons from P&G and inserts them into the paperboard cartons.

Related Sponsored Content

“The packaging was designed to communicate a premium affordable whitening product” explains Mike Lynch P&G’s North American oral care project manager.

Mailed free to pharmaceutical and retail store managers the associates’ kit consists of a 7½’’ x 8½’’ x 2’’ book-style carton. An inner section is die cut with finger holes to allow easy extraction of a

56-count Whitestrips carton which fits snuggly inside. A 1½’’-wide single piece of scored B-flute corrugated frame fits inside the inner perimeter of the carton—where it is hidden from view—to bolster the strength of the carton’s walls.

An educational ‘fifth’

The book carton’s most striking feature is its cover a fifth panel that unfolds to provide a 15’’-wide billboard loaded with product information.

“Much of the [carton space] was dedicated to education and usage instruction relating to the new technologically advanced delivery method” Lynch points out. The educational aspect was as important as the packaging’s aesthetics. Unfolded the three panels address respectively how Whitestrips work what they are and frequently asked questions about the product.

The fold-out billboard also eliminates the need for any literature inserts which could become separated and lost after opening. The informational copy was written by Deskey Associates (Cincinnati OH) which also designed the graphics.

After shrink wrapping the sealed cartons were sent to P&G.

With a suggested price of $52.99 the photo gift pack was tested in two cities near Denver CO ahead of the 2001 Christmas holiday season. It consists of a book-style

9’’ x 2’’ x 9’’ carton containing a reusable camera 56-count carton of Whitestrips a picture frame and an angled photo album.

Its fifth panel cover is single-wall SBS die cut with a large view window to display the contents.

Beneath the photo album is an angled platform of unprinted SBS. The wedge-shaped SBS better positions the album parallel to the package front to make it more pleasing to consumers. A clear shrink film overwrap seals and protects the entire carton.

Lynch says Whitestrips has yielded “terrific one-year results” an outcome that should have P&G personnel smiling.

Comments(0)

Add new comment

E-BOOK SPECIAL REPORT
42 Best Package Designs
Sign up to receive timely updates from our editors and download this e-book consisting of our editors' picks of most notable package designs. Updated for 2014!
x

Newsletters

Don't miss intelligence crucial to your job and business!
Click on any newsletter to view a sample. Enter your email address below to sign up!
GENERAL INTEREST
PACKAGE DESIGN/DEVELOPMENT
Each newsletter ranges in frequency from once per month to a few times per month at most.