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Plastic spring-water bottle redesign embraces tradition

Inspired by the company’s own century-plus heritage, a new PET bottle and label design for Hot Springs, AR-based Mountain Valley Spring Co.’s spring water in 0.5- and 1.5-L sizes capitalizes on substance and tradition, but adds a modern twist.
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FILED IN:  Package Component  > Films
     
At least that’s how Mountain Valley chief marketing officer Jim Karrh describes the new design. “We’ve synthesized the pillars of our brand to be ‘quality,’ ‘heritage,’ and ‘Americana,’” he adds. “That means that everything we do, including our packaging, has to reflect at least one of those pillars—and do so in an authentic way.”

The redesigned PET bottle comes hard on the heels of a redesigned glass bottle developed late last year. Created with the help of brand identity and package design consultants Flowdesign (www.flow-design.com), the new glass bottle was modeled after a design used by the company in the 1930s. Echoes from the 1930s bottle include sophisticated contours and a mountain-valley label vignette that is etched in glass on the new design. Prominent on the new glass bottle’s label is the Mountain Valley logotype in an eye-catching red cartouche.

After the redesign of the glass bottle, Mountain Valley turned its attention to the company’s PET version. Relates Dan Matauch, principal of Flowdesign, “Our goal for this project was to combine the redesigned label of the glass bottle, but add a contemporary flair to the plastic bottle shape.” The resulting green-hued bottle offers an hourglass profile, providing a substantial hand feel for consumers, notes Karrh, and is molded with a depiction of rolling mountains topped with pine trees and the words “Since 1871,” embossed above the label. The bottle is molded on-site by Mountain Valley’s Veriplas Containers (www.veriplas.com) plastics division using equipment from Sidel (www.sidel.com).
The glue-applied film label is converted by Valley Label (www.valleylabel.net) and is applied at Mountain Valley’s facility, using B&H Labeling Systems’ (www.bhlabeling.com) roll-fed labelers (see packworld.com/view-16126).

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According to Karrh, the recent improvements made to Mountain Valley’s packaging have opened the door to retail and on-premise opportunities for the product, which was previously sold only through independent home and office delivery distributors. “We’ve already seen successes at retailers such as Whole Foods and on-premise operators such as Ted’s Montana Grills,” Karrh says.

—Anne Marie Mohan

Podcast available at packworld.com/view-23954

 

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